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CWO2 & Mrs. Paul D. Henriott, US Army, Retired, web masters



"The Final March"


Military Honors Funeral


(So the family will know what might happen upon my passing.)

Full-honors Funeral: (shown in the images below
In addition to the standard military honors, commissioned and warrant officers may receive; An escort platoon and a military band (size varies according to the rank of the deceased). Additionally, officers buried in Arlington Cemetery may have the use of the caisson, if available.


Army color guard during a funeral service at Arlington National Cemetery.
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An escort platoon and a military band
(size varies according to the rank of the deceased and number of funerals that day).


Members of the Army escort platoon


Army casket team place urn in casket.


Army casket team place urn in casket on caisson.


Army casket team place a folded flag on top of urn in the casket.


A secured flag-draped casket on caisson.


The U.S. Army Ceremonial Band.


Army escort platoon march through Arlington National Cemetery.


Army funeral processional winds through Arlington National Cemetery.


The casket team escort the casket on the caisson.


Army funeral processional march through McClellan Gate.


Army funeral processional march through McClellan Gate.


Army caske team escort casket to burial site.


Army casket team escort casket to burial site.


Army casket team remove urn from casket.


Army escort platoon (left) and the firing party (center).


The U.S. Army Ceremonial Band play music.


Army casket team carry urn to gravesite or at Columbarium.


Army casket team unfold flag over urn.


Army chaplain presides over service as casket team hold flag over urn.


Army firing party gets ready for final three-volley salute.
End Of "The Final March"
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If the Battle Hymn march has stop playing.
You can then start playing Old Soliers Never Die.




ACKNOWNLEDGEMENTS

Special thank you to two great organizations, for their
wonderful labors in honoring our nation’s heroes.

The Arlington Ladies
65 years of service


Wreaths Across America and their
national network of volunteers 20 Years of service.

Special thank you to two great organizations, for their
wonderful labors in honoring our nation’s heroes.


Since 1973, The Arlington Ladies
No airman or Coast Guardsman
is ever buried alone


In 1948, the wife of the Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force, Hoyt Vandenberg, formed a group from the Officer’s Wives Club to attend Air Force funerals. In 1972, General Creighton Abrams wife, Julia, founded the Army’s version of the group. In 1985, the Navy also followed suit by creating a group of their own. The Marines do not officially have a group as they send a representative of the Marine Commandant to every funeral. Today, the Air Force, Army, Navy and Coast Guard all have Arlington Ladies who perform similar volunteer duties at Arlington National Cemetery for members of their respective services, attending services for all veterans.


Christmas At Arlington 2011



Wreaths Across America and our
national network of volunteers
laid over 220,000 memorial wreaths.
The wreath laying is still held annually
on the second Saturday of every December.




Morrill Worcester, owner of Worcester Wreath Company of Harrington, Maine, was a 12 year old paper boy for the Bangor Daily News when he won a trip to Washington D.C. His first trip to our nation’s capital was one he would never forget, and Arlington National Cemetery made an especially indelible impression on him. This experience followed him throughout his life and successful career in business, reminding him that his good fortune was due, in large part, to the values of this nation and the Veterans who made the ultimate sacrifice for their Country.

In 1992, Worcester Wreath found themselves with a surplus of wreaths nearing the end of the holiday season. Remembering his boyhood experience at Arlington, Worcester realized he had an opportunity to honor our country’s Veterans. With the help of Maine Senator Olympia Snowe, arrangements were made for the wreaths to be placed at Arlington in one of the older sections of the cemetery, a section which had been receiving fewer visitors with each passing year.

The annual tribute went on quietly for several years, until 2005, when a photo of the stones at Arlington, adorned with wreaths and covered in snow, circulated around the internet. Suddenly, the project received national attention. Thousands of requests poured in from all over the country from people wanting to help with Arlington, to emulate the Arlington project at their National and State cemeteries, or to simply share their stories and thank Morrill Worcester for honoring our nation’s heroes.

In 2010, Wreaths Across America and our national network of volunteers laid over 220,000 memorial wreaths at 545 locations in the United States and beyond. We were able to include ceremonies at the Pearl Harbor Memorial, as well as Bunker Hill, Valley Forge and the sites of the September 11 tragedies. We accomplished this with help from 902 fundraising groups, corporate contributions, and donations of trucking, shipping, and thousands of helping hands.

The wreath laying is still held annually, on the second Saturday of every December. Our annual pilgrimage from Harrington, Maine to Arlington National Cemetery has become known as the world’s largest veteran’s parade, stopping at schools, monuments, veteran’s homes and communities all along the way to remind people how important it is to remember, honor and teach.

Wreaths Across America also conducts several programs to honor our Veterans, including our popular “Thanks a Million” campaign which distributes cards to people all over the country to give Veterans a simple “thank you” for their service. We participate in Veterans’ events throughout the year, and have a Veteran liaison on staff to work with local Veterans organizations.




CWO2 and Mrs Paul D. Henriott
US Army, Retired, web masters
Last updated 25 March 2014