5 Medal of Honor Catholic Chaplain Recipients page 6

Cathlolic Chaplains Monument
Chaplains Hill Arlington National Cemetery

The monument is an unpolished granite stone with a bronze plaque. The stone stands 6 feet 10 inches tall and is 42 inches wide and 10 inches thick. The plaque is 50 inches by 30 inches. It lists the names of the chaplains alphabetically for


CATHOLIC CHAPLAINS WHO DIED SERVING THEIR COUNTRY IN
WORLD WAR AND IN THE KOREAN AND VIETNAM CONFLICTS.

WORLR WAR II

ANTONUCCI, RALPH A.
BABST JULIUS J.
BACIGALUPO, ANDREW
BARRETT, THOMAS J.
BARTLEY, EDWARD L.
BINA, ELWIN J.
BONNER, PETER L.
BRADLEY, EDWARD F.
BRADY, THOMAS T.
BUTTERBACH, HERBERT
CALLAHAN, JOHN L.
CARBERRY, RICHARD E.
COLGAN, AQUINAS T.
CONTINO, WILLIAM S.
CONWAY, ANTHONY J.
CUMMINGS, WILLIAM T.
CZUBAK, ANTHONY E.
DOYLE, NEIL J.
DUFFY, WILLIAM P. F.
DUNLEAVY, JAMES P.
EDELEN, PHILIP B.
FALTER, CLEMENT M.
FELIX, WALTER J.

FLAHERTY, PATRICK X.
FLYNN, JAMES P.
FOLEY, JOHN E.
GILLESPIE, DOMINIC F.
GILMORE, JOSEPH A.
GOUGH, LAWRENCE A.
GUILFOYLE, WILLIAM
HAGAN, CLARENCE J.
HAUSMAN, CARL W.
HUGHES, JOHN P.
IRWIN, WILLIAM A.
JOHNSON, ALFRED W.
KERR, JAMES P.
KILSDONK, JOHN W.
KNOX, THOMAS J.
KOBEL, JEROME
LAFLEUR, JOSEPH V.
LENAGHAN, ARTHUR C.
LISTON, JAMES M.
LYMCH, LAWRENCE E.
MALONY, PATRICK J.
MATERNOWSKI, IGNATIUS
MONAGHAN, OWEN T.
MONAHAN, JOHN F.
MCDONNELL, JOHN J.
MCGARRITY, JOHN J.
MCMANUS, FRANCIS J.
* O'BRIEN, JAMES W.
O'GRADY, EUGENE P.
O'TOOLE, MYLES F.
POLEWSKI, LADISLUS A.
POLHEMUS, EUGENE
RECHSTEINER,LEO G.
ROBINSON, JOHN F.
RYAN, JOHN A.
SAVIGNAC, FALMORE G.
* SCECINA, THOMAS J.
SCHMITT, ALOYSIUS
SHARP, CURTIS J.
STOBER, HENRY
TERNAN, DOMINIC
VANDERHEIDEN, JOSEPH
VERRET, JOHN J.
VINCENT, CLARENCE A.
* WASHINGTON, JOHN P.
WEILAND, FIDELIS M.
ZERFAS,MATHIAS E.

KOREAN CONFLICT

BRUNNERT, LAWRENCE F.
COPPENS, FRANCIS X.

CRAIG, LEO P.
FELHOELTER, HERMAN G.

KAPAUN, EMIL J.
MAHER, WILLIAM E.

<
VIETNAM CONFLICT

BARRAGY, WILLIAM J.
BRETT, ROBERT R.

* CAPODANNO, VINCENT R.
GARRITY, WILLIAM J.
MCGONIGAL, ALOYSIUS P.

QUEALY, MICHAEL J.
* WATTERS, CHARLES J.

MAY GOD GRANT PEACE TO THEM AND
TO THE NATIONAL THEY SERVED SO WELL


Military Chaplains (Roman Catholic)
Service to God and Country



U.S. Army Chaplain Museum photo Chaplain (Major) Charles J. Watters celebrates Mass in Vietnam with his chaplain assistant(name unknown) shortly before his death (November 19,1967). The U. S. Army Chaplain Center School is named in his honor...Watters Hall.


ACKNOWNLEDGEMENTS

This webpage is a very special gift to All Catholic service members of our armed forces, to Judy McCloskey and Catholics in the Military. Which is dedicated to strengthening military families and promoting vocations to the Military Archdiocese. Thank you Judy for your dedication and hard work.


I would like to thank the following: Photos of Medal of Honor recipients Courtesy of HomeOfHeroes.com by C. Douglas Sterner please feel free to use whatever is of value to your own efforts. Thanks for your service to our Nation. U.S. Army  Chaplain Center and School, Fort Jackson, South Carolina courtesy of the U.S. Army Chaplain Museum for the opening Mass photo. Kimberly T. Pierce, Executive Director of The Chapel of Four Chaplains


You have our permission to use the biography of Chaplain John P. Washington, as well as the Four Chaplains image, on your web site in the manner it is shown.


DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY
NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE
WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

The Online Library for the use of their images and biographies of the people. The use
of the official U.S. Navy photographs now in the collections of the National Archives.




Priest and Soldier

Chaplains must walk a line different from the ordinary officer's. Chaplains should never forget that they are responsible to two professions, to two chains of command, a line commander and the church that ordained them. The chaplain is and must be a tightrope walker, aware constantly of balancing the needs of the individual, the church, and the military. Chaplains are soldiers, but unarmed. Although they go where their troops go, they are in a different category. For example, if captured and sent to a prisoner-of- war camp, they will be "detained persons," not "prisoners of war." The laws of war recognize that chaplains, like doctors, have different responsibilities from those of combat troops. The laws of war provide for the continuation of their work even under prison conditions.

Walking the chaplain's tightrope is, though not without difficulties, well within human powers. Many men and women have, I believe, done it remarkably well. Certainly, I have never regretted my dual vocation as priest and soldier.

A Concise History of the Chaplain CorpsThe history of the Chaplain Corps traces its beginnings to 28 November 1775 when the second article of Navy Regulations was adopted. It stated that "the Commanders of the ships of the thirteen United Colonies are to take care that divine services be performed twice a day on board and a sermon preached on Sundays, unless bad weather or other extraordinary accidents prevent. Although chaplains were not specifically mentioned in this article, one can imply that Congress intended that an ordained clergyman be part of ship's company. Later documents support that conclusion.

Reverend Benjamin Balch was the first chaplain known to have served in the Continental Navy, reporting aboard the frigate BOSTON in October 1778. The number of chaplains by the turn of the century only totaled six, and at that, only two were retained

A new edition of Naval Regulations dated 25 January 1802 included reference to the duties of a chaplain. "He is to read prayers at stated periods; perform all funeral ceremonies; perform the duty of schoolmaster instructing the midshipmen and volunteers in writing, arithmetic, navigation and whatever else they might need to make them proficient; and teach the other youths of the ship as the captain orders."

Because of their teaching skills, when various "academies" were established aboard the ships in central ports, the chaplains were called on to be the administrators. Their involvement in these early learning institutions prompted Chaplain George Jones to begin his campaign for the Naval Academy in 1839. The establishment of the Naval School at Annapolis (later the United States Naval Academy) in 1845 was due primarily to Chaplain Jones' efforts.

By October 1906, the Chaplain Corps began to come into its own. Steering away from the teaching function, a board of chaplains appointed by the Secretary of the Navy established guidelines which would require that all newly commissioned chaplains be graduated of both college and seminary and that such should receive the endorsement of their denominations; and that all candidates appear before a board of Navy chaplains for their endorsement as to health and other qualifications. They also recommended that there should be a Chief of Chaplains. The board's recommendations gave birth to the Chaplain Corps as it is known today

To recount the history of the Chaplain Corps and omit two of its most revered chaplains would be a grave mistake. The bravery of Chaplains Joseph T. O'Callahan and Vincent Capodanno gives credence to the faith by which we stand. Both were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for their remarkable willingness to perform their duties in the face of the fiercest adversities. Their spirit is present in the daily contributions the men and women of the Chaplain Corps continue to make to the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard today.

dated 1993
written by:
Lieutenant Margaret G. Kibben, CHC, USNR
History Projects Officer, Chaplain Resource Board




"TRIBUTE TO TRUE AMERICAN HEROES"




Recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor


Congressional Medal of Honor
(Army)

Congressional Medal of Honor
(Navy)


Father Vincent R. Capodanno, Roman Catholic, (posthumously)
Father Angelo J. Liteky Roman Catholic, 81 still living
Father Joseph T. O'Callahan, Roman Catholic, (deceased)
Father Charles Joseph Watters, Roman Catholic, (posthumously)



Awarded the Army's Distinguished Service Cross and
later First Recipients of the Four Chaplains' Medal


Four Chaplains' Medal

Army's Distinguished Service Cross
>

Reverend George D. Fox, Methodist, posthumously
Reverend Clark V. Poling, Dutch Reformed, posthumously
Father John P. Washington,Roman Catholic, posthumously



Military Chaplains (Roman Catholic) Navy
Service to God and Country

Only two Navy Chaplains have received the Congressional Medal of Honor. The recipients are Chaplains Joseph T. O'Callahan and Vincent R. Capodanno.

Chaplain O'Callahan was the first chaplain of any military service to be so honored.



U.S. Navy photo


Commander Joseph T. O'Callahan, USNR(ChC), Catholic Chaplain of USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42), Celebrates military Mass at the high altar of the Candaleria Cathedral, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, while USS Franklin D. Roosevelt was visiting that city during her shakedown cruise, February 1946. Members of the ship's crew are assisting Commander O'Callahan.










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Please honor these Heroes.


This Web Page was created by and
is maintained by Paul D. Henriott
Webpage reworked 28 September 2012