TRIBUTE TO A TRUE AMERICAN HERO


A helping hand by Father Kapaun


Servant of God
Father Emil Kapaun, (Captain)
Chaplain's Corp, US Army, POW
Father Kapaun is the most decorated
military chaplain in United States history.



Emil Joseph Kapaun was born to Enos and Elizabeth Kapaun on April 20, 1916. The pious parents of Bohemian extract lived on a farm three miles southwest of Pilsen, Kansas. The elements found in their home, church and the parochial schools he attended, clearly point to how this Kansas farm boy became an idol, hero and saint to men of every creed and calling,


The early depression years saw Emil studying classical and philosophy courses at Conception College, Conception, Missouri, from where he was graduated in June of 1936. So it was again that Emil’s Pastor, together with the Bishop, saw to the substantial financial end of Emil’s studies at Kendrick Theological Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri, where he was ordained in June of 1940.

The twenty-eight year-old-priest began training for the service at Camp Wheeler, Georgia, in October of 1944. He and one other chaplain had 1900 servicemen and women under their spiritual care.



In April 1945, Father Kapaun was sent to India and Burma. It was here that he found his life’s calling, with the soldiers, the missionaries, and the poor. Every month he would travel about two thousand miles, offering Mass and hearing confessions, in tents, or even on the hood of his jeep; wherever the troops were scattered he found a way to reach them. In a letter to his bishop he revealed how happy he was and how close he felt to God. Within just a year’s time, with their own money and the generous gifts of the troops, the American chaplains were even able to build a church and a school for missionary priests and nuns.

In January of 1946, Father Kapaun was promoted to Captain. In May, however, with the end of the campaign in Burma, he was ordered to return to the states with the soldiers.

Fr. Kapaun returned to his parish in Pilsen after ordination and became assistant to Fr. Sklenar. He was also the Auxiliary Chaplain at Herington Air Base nearby Pilsen. In December of 1943, Fr. Kapaun was appointed Pastor to replace Fr. Sklenar now 70 years plus who resigned. Because he was raised in the parish for which he was now pastor, Fr. Kapaun felt that he was in good conscience, a great moral obstacle to those friends and relatives there who he thought were superior to himself both in age and education. He therefore asked for and received permission from his Bishop to volunteer for the Army and a Chaplaincy. He was relieved of his pastorate at Pilsen in July of 1944.

Fr. Kapaun began his Soldiering for God at Camp Wheeler, Georgia, in October of 1944. He and one other Chaplain served some 19,000 service men and women. His stay there was a brief one. His shipping orders were cut and he was sent to the India - Burma Theater in April of 1945. There he would travel by air and jeep over 2,000 miles to have Mass for the troops at the Forward Areas. Fr. Kapaun noted in a letter to his Bishop how happy he was and that his contact with the local Missionaries was most edifying and uplifting, especially when seeing what sacrifices they made to do their work. He felt a closeness with God, working with the missionaries and the poor that they served. The Chaplains, together with the troops, erected a church and school for the Priests and Nuns. They also gave them financial support.

Fr. Kapaun was promoted to Captain in January of 1946. Thereafter many troops were returned stateside and Fr. Kapaun returned in May of 1946.

After a short vacation, he was appointed temporary administrator of St. John Church, Spearville, Kansas. The Bishop wanted the Veteran Chaplains to get a degree in education to qualify them as accredited teachers in their diocesan and public high schools. The Bishop, upon Fr. Kapaun’s discharge from the Army in July of 1946, approved his entrance into Catholic University, Washington D.C.. He was graduated with an M.A. in education in February of 1948.

In April of 1948, the Bishop appointed him pastor of Timken, Kansas. Again, in good conscience and knowing the coming crisis in Korea, he believed that he should offer himself for work in the Armed Forces. So it was, that in September of 1948, he re-enlisted in the Army. He resumed his Chaplaincy at Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas. Fr. Kapaun left his parents and Pilsen for the last time in December of 1949.

He sailed for Yokohama, Japan, in January of 1950. He was stationed near Mt. Fuji, Japan, until alerted into combat in July of 1950.

In July of 1950, Fr. Kapaun's unit, the 35th Brigade from Ft. Bliss landed in South Korea during a big invasion. He was constantly on the move northward until his capture by Chinese Communists in November of 1950. His main complaint was lack of sleep for several weeks at a time. He was constantly administering to the dead and dying while performing baptisms, hearing first confessions for Holy Communion and celebrating Mass from an improvised altar set up on the front end of an army jeep. He constantly would lose his Mass Kit, jeep and trailer to enemy fire. He told how he was thoroughly convinced that the prayers of many others were what had saved him so many times up until his capture. He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal in September of 1950.



In the middle of the battle area, Father Kapaun said Mass on the hood of a Jeep; the Blessed Sacrament was reserved on his own body. His letters home reflected the gratitude for the prayers of his people; his award of the bronze star was only mentioned modestly under general remarks in his monthly report to the bishop.

His pipe was Fr. Kapaun’s inseparable companion, even in the thick of battle. A minor casualty occurred when the bullet of a North Korean sniper demolished the stem of his favorite briar. He quit smoking only long enough to whittle another stem from bamboo. In another battle, his pipe was again knocked out of his mouth. One International News photo showed a smiling Kapaun holding his broken pipe.


Sometime in October 1950, Father Kapaun took the wheel of a Jeep loaded with wounded men when the driver was killed and drove the patients over fire-swept roads to safety. He acted as if this was all in a day’s work; to the men he became a legend. In the heat of battle, he continued saying Mass, ministering to the wounded, and, when there was spare time, burying the dead enemies and assisting with the graves registration of his own men.

During the Red attack on November 1 near Unsan, Father Kapaun went back to the fighting to assist Dr. Clarence Anderson and was captured along with the twelve hundred other men. The priest and doctor had both elected to stay with the wounded, though they knew that capture meant certain death. The weather was cold, but the last word from escaping prisoners was that the chaplain had continued to minister to the sick and wounded in spite of badly frostbitten feet

The following is a general narrative from the many reports of Fr. Kapaun's ordeal as a prisoner of war given by many repatriated American soldiers after their release from prison camps. He was most remembered for his great humility, bravery, his constancy, his love and kindness and solicitude for his fellow prisoners. "He was their hero -- their admired and beloved ‘padre’. He kept up the G.I.’s morale, and most of all a lot of men to become good Catholics."

A lieutenant captured within days of Father Kapaun testified that the priest carried a wounded soldier on a stretcher for the entire 10 miles to a small Korean farm house near Pyoktong. The officers were put in the farm house and forbidden to see the men, but Father Kapaun would get out and sneak down to the sick and wounded first, and then visit and pray with the men. He continuously volunteered for the burial details.

The same officer relates that the men were nearly starving, so Father would go on a ration run to get cracked corn, millet, and soy beans. Before he went, he said prayers to Stain Dismas, the Good Thief. The lieutenant was confident Father Kapaun’s prayers were answered because “he would steal, or get away with, sometimes two one-hundred-pound sacks of grain plus pockets full of salt which was very scarce. Pretty soon all of us were praying earnestly to Saint Dismas, but Father succeeded much better than the rest of us. Every night we held prayers and he prayed, not only for deliverance of us from the hands of the enemy, but also prayed for the Communists to be delivered from their atheistic materialism.”

In indoctrination sessions as the Chinese yelled and screamed, Father Kapaun softly and calmly refuted their statements. When they taunted him that he could not see or hear or feel God and that thus, God did not exist, Chaplain Kapaun quietly pointed out that Mao Tse-Tung could not make a tree or a flower or stop the thunder and lightening. He also told them that his God was as real as the air they breathed but could not see, as the thoughts and ideas they had, but could not see or feel. After a while, they let him alone, since they were afraid of his arguments.


At Easter in April 1951, the men noticed that their “Padre” was limping badly. The two doctors cornered him and found that he had a blood clot in his leg and that it was badly swollen. They forced him to lie on the floor and put his leg in a makeshift suspension, forcing him to lie that way for over a month. His only complaint was that he thought he was a burden to the others. About May 19, the pain in Father’s leg became unbearable. An officer who was with Father Kapaun shortly before the priest was taken to the “hospital” where he died relates, “In his last hour, he heard my confession and told me to dedicate my life to the Blessed Virgin Mary, that she would intercede for me to Jesus, her Son. He told all of us the story of the Seven Maccabees. A mother has seven children, all of whom refused to repudiate God to the king. One by one they were killed. She cried, not tears of pain and privation, but tears of joy. Her children were with God. As he told us this, his own eyes were filled with tears of agony, I knew and he knew I knew! Father Kapaun said, ‘As you see, I am crying too, not tears of pain but tears of joy, because I’ll be with my God in a short time.”

Reports received noted that Fr. Kapaun’s feet had become badly frozen, but that he continued to administer to the sick and wounded. He continuously went out under heavy mortar and shelling to carry or pull into holes wounded and or dying soldiers at personal risk of being captured or killed.

Many accounts were given as to the many creature comforts he provided the many of his comrades of the 8th Cavalry Regiment during imprisonment. They were both spiritual and physical. He provided endless hours of prayer and what nourishment he could find to all he could to keep them from starving to death.

The given account of Fr. Kapaun’s life as told in the story of Chaplain Kapaun (Patriot Priest of the Korean Conflict) by Father Arthur Tonne. Fr. Tonne states that "In a very definite sense, we are all beneficiaries from the life of Fr Kapaun. He has left us a stirring example of devotion to duty. He has passed on to us a spirit of tolerance and understanding. He has given us a share of dauntless bravery -- of body and soul. He has transmitted to every one of us a new appreciation of America, and a keener, more realistic understanding of our country’s greatest enemy -- godlessness, now stalking the world in the form of Communism. He has bequeathed a picture of Christ-like life. What Father Kapaun willed to us cannot be contained in memorials, however costly or beautiful. It is a treasure for the human soul -- the spirit of one who loved and served God and man -- even unto death."

A lieutenant captured within days of Father Kapaun testified that the priest carried a wounded soldier on a stretcher for the entire 10 miles to a small Korean farmhouse near Pyoktong. The officers were put in the farmhouse and forbidden to see the men, but Father Kapaun would get out and sneak down to the sick and wounded first, and then visit and pray with the men. He continuously volunteered for the burial details.

The same officer relates that the men were nearly starving, so Father would go on a ration run to get cracked corn, millet, and soy beans. Before he went, he said prayers to Stain Dismas, the Good Thief. The lieutenant was confident Father Kapaun’s prayers were answered because “he would steal, or get away with, sometimes two one-hundred-pound sacks of grain plus pockets full of salt which was very scarce. Pretty soon all of us were praying earnestly to Saint Dismas, but Father succeeded much better than the rest of us.

Every night we held prayers and he prayed, not only for deliverance of us from the hands of the enemy, but also prayed for the Communists to be delivered from their atheistic materialism.”

In indoctrination sessions as the Chinese yelled and screamed, Father Kapaun softly and calmly refuted their statements. When they taunted him that he could not see or hear or feel God and that thus, God did not exist, Chaplain Kapaun quietly pointed out that Mao Tse-Tung could not make a tree or a flower or stop the thunder and lightening. He also told them that his God was as real as the air they breathed but could not see, as the thoughts and ideas they had, but could not see or feel. After a while, they let him alone, since they were afraid of his arguments.

At Easter in April 1951, the men noticed that their “Padre” was limping badly. The two doctors cornered him and found that he had a blood clot in his leg and that it was badly swollen. They forced him to lie on the floor and put his leg in a makeshift suspension, forcing him to lie that way for over a month. His only complaint was that he thought he was a burden to the others. About May 19, the pain in Father’s leg became unbearable.

An officer who was with Father Kapaun shortly before the priest was taken to the “hospital” where he died relates, “In his last hour, he heard my confession and told me to dedicate my life to the Blessed Virgin Mary, that she would intercede for me to Jesus, her Son. He told all of us the story of the Seven Maccabees. A mother has seven children, all of whom refused to repudiate God to the king. One by one they were killed. She cried, not tears of pain and privation, but tears of joy. Her children were with God. As he told us this, his own eyes were filled with tears of agony, I knew and he knew I knew! Father Kapaun said, ‘As you see, I am crying too, not tears of pain but tears of joy, because I’ll be with my God in a short time.”

When the Chinese came to take Father Kapaun to the hospital, his fellow officers protested but to no avail. The hospital was a place where they took people to die; only about five officers out of sixty had ever come back from there. The Chinese saw a good chance to get the man they feared, now that he was helpless. Father knew, as soon as he saw the stretcher, where he was going.

Fr. Kapaun, himself, weakened as months passed on. He managed to lead Easter sunrise service. He was so weak that the prison guards took him to the hospital. As Father Kapaun was raised on the stretcher, he told one of the men, “Walt, if I don’t’ come back, tell my Bishop I died a happy death.

There he would die from pneumonia on May 23, 1951.






Memorial To
Servant of God, Father Emil Kapaun
Captain, Chaplain's Corp, US Army, POW
Born: April 20, 1916 ~ Died: May 23, 1951








Son of Enos and Elizabeth Kapaun
of Pilsen, Kansas



The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 3, 1863, has awarded in the name of Congress the Medal of Honor posthumously to Chaplain (Captain) Emil J. Kapaun, United States Army.


The Medal of Honor Citation reads:

Chaplain Emil J. Kapaun distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy at Unsan, Korea, from November 1-2, 1950. On November 1, as Chinese Communist Forces viciously attacked friendly elements, Chaplain Kapaun calmly walked through withering enemy fire in order to provide comfort and medical aid to his comrades and rescue friendly wounded from no-man’s land. Though the Americans successfully repelled the assault, they found themselves surrounded by the enemy. Facing annihilation, the able-bodied men were ordered to evacuate. However, Chaplain Kapaun, fully aware of his certain capture, elected to stay behind with the wounded. After the enemy succeeded in breaking through the defense in the early morning hours of November 2, Chaplain Kapaun continually made rounds, as hand-to-hand combat ensued. As Chinese Communist Forces approached the American position, Chaplain Kapaun noticed an injured Chinese officer amongst the wounded and convinced him to negotiate the safe surrender of the American Forces. Shortly after his capture, Chaplain Kapaun, with complete disregard for his personal safety and unwavering resolve, bravely pushed aside an enemy soldier preparing to execute Sergeant First Class Herbert A. Miller. Not only did Chaplain Kapaun’s gallantry save the life of Sergeant Miller, but also his unparalleled courage and leadership inspired all those present, including those who might have otherwise fled in panic, to remain and fight the enemy until captured. Chaplain Kapaun’s extraordinary heroism and selflessness, above and beyond the call of duty, are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, the 1st Cavalry Division, and the United States Army.


President Barack Obama presents Medal of Honor posthumously to
Ray Kapaun (nephew) of Father Emil Kapaun

To view Ceremony Video



Military Service Decorations

Kapaun’s military record In addition to the Medal of Honor, Father Emil Kapaun has won several other medals for his service in World War II and the Korean War:
Army Distinguished Service Cross
Legion of Merit
Purple Heart
Bronze Star Medal with "V" device for valor
Combat Infantryman’s Badge
Korean Service Medal
National Defense Medal
United Nations Service Medal
Korean Presidential Unit Citation
Republic of Korea Service Medal
World War II Victory Medal


Excerpts from a pamphlet written by 1st Lt. Ray M. (Mike) Dowe, Jr.

He wore the cross of the Chaplain branch instead of the crossed rifles of the infantry, but he was, I think, the best foot soldier I ever knew, and the kindest. His name was Emil Joseph Kapaun, and he was a priest of the Roman Catholic Church. The men he served in the prison camps of Korea didn't care whether he was Catholic or Baptist, Lutheran or Presbyterian. To all of them, Catholic, Protestant and Jew alike, and to men who professed no formal faith at all, he was simply "FATHER," and each of them, when in trouble came, drew courage and hope and strength from him.

He's dead now, murdered by the Red Chinese, and his body lies in an unmarked grave somewhere along the Yalu. The hundreds of men who knew and loved him have not forgotten him. I write this so folks at home can know what kind of a man he was, and what he did for us, and how he died.

The first thing I want to make clear is this, he was a priest of the Church, and a man of great piety, but there was nothing ethereal about him, nothing soft or unctious or holier than thou. He wore his piety in his heart. Outwardly he was all G.I., tough of body, rough of speech sometimes, full of the wry humor of the combat soldier. In a camp where men had to steal or starve, he was the most accomplished food thief of them all. In a prison whose inmates hated their communist captors with a bone deep hate, he was the most unbending enemy of Communism, and when they tried to brainwash him, he had the guts to tell them to their faces that they lied. He pitied the Reds for their delusions, but he preached no doctrine of D and could be considered only the third American-born saint.



Priest and Soldier

Chaplains must walk a line different from the ordinary officer's. Chaplains should never forget that they are responsible to two professions, to two chains of command, a line commander and the church that ordained them. The chaplain is and must be a tightrope walker, aware constantly of balancing the needs of the individual, the church, and the military. Chaplains are soldiers, but unarmed. Although they go where their troops go, they are in a different category. For example, if captured and sent to a prisoner-of- war camp, they will be "detained persons," not "prisoners of war." The laws of war recognize that chaplains, like doctors, have different responsibilities from those of combat troops. The laws of war provide for the continuation of their work even under prison conditions.

Walking the chaplain's tightrope is, though not without difficulties, well within human powers. Many men and women have, I believe, done it remarkably well. Certainly, I have never regretted my dual vocation as priest and soldier.

A Concise History of the Chaplain CorpsThe history of the Chaplain Corps traces its beginnings to 28 November 1775 when the second article of Navy Regulations was adopted. It stated that "the Commanders of the ships of the thirteen United Colonies are to take care that divine services be performed twice a day on board and a sermon preached on Sundays, unless bad weather or other extraordinary accidents prevent. Although chaplains were not specifically mentioned in this article, one can imply that Congress intended that an ordained clergyman be part of ship's company. Later documents support that conclusion.

Reverend Benjamin Balch was the first chaplain known to have served in the Continental Navy, reporting aboard the frigate BOSTON in October 1778. The number of chaplains by the turn of the century only totaled six, and at that, only two were retained

A new edition of Naval Regulations dated 25 January 1802 included reference to the duties of a chaplain. "He is to read prayers at stated periods; perform all funeral ceremonies; perform the duty of schoolmaster instructing the midshipmen and volunteers in writing, arithmetic, navigation and whatever else they might need to make them proficient; and teach the other youths of the ship as the captain orders."

Because of their teaching skills, when various "academies" were established aboard the ships in central ports, the chaplains were called on to be the administrators. Their involvement in these early learning institutions prompted Chaplain George Jones to begin his campaign for the Naval Academy in 1839. The establishment of the Naval School at Annapolis (later the United States Naval Academy) in 1845 was due primarily to Chaplain Jones' efforts.

By October 1906, the Chaplain Corps began to come into its own. Steering away from the teaching function, a board of chaplains appointed by the Secretary of the Navy established guidelines which would require that all newly commissioned chaplains be graduated of both college and seminary and that such should receive the endorsement of their denominations; and that all candidates appear before a board of Navy chaplains for their endorsement as to health and other qualifications. They also recommended that there should be a Chief of Chaplains. The board's recommendations gave birth to the Chaplain Corps as it is known today

To recount the history of the Chaplain Corps and omit two of its most revered chaplains would be a grave mistake. The bravery of Chaplains Joseph T. O'Callahan and Vincent Capodanno gives credence to the faith by which we stand. Both were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for their remarkable willingness to perform their duties in the face of the fiercest adversities. Their spirit is present in the daily contributions the men and women of the Chaplain Corps continue to make to the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard today.

dated 1993
written by:
Lieutenant Margaret G. Kibben, CHC, USNR
History Projects Officer, Chaplain Resource Board






Servant of God
Father Emil Kapaun's
Cause for Sainthood

Possible Miracles

On Sunday, June 29, 2008, the Opening Ceremony which officially opens the Cause for Sainthood for Fr. Emil Kapaun was made on Father Kapaun Day held at St. John Nepomucene Catholic Church in Pilsen, Kansas.

On June 26, 2009, Dr. Andrea Ambrosi, the Roman Postulator for Father Kapaun's cause for canonization arrived in Wichita in order to interview doctors in relation to alleged miraculous events. Among these, the claims of 20-year-old Chase Kear who survived a severe head injury last year in part, because he and his family claim, they successfully petitioned Fr. Emil Kapaun to intercede for them.

Kear, a member of the Hutchinson Community College track team, fell on his head during pole vaulting practice in October 2008 but, it is said, was miraculously healed despite being near death.

The Rev. John Hotze, the judicial vicar for the Diocese of Wichita, and trained in Canon Law, will assist in investigating Kear's case. Fr. Hotze has spent eight years investigating the proposed sainthood of Kapaun. The Catholic Church has considered canonizing Fr. Kapaun ever since soldiers were liberated from Korean prisoner-of-war camps in 1953 and retold tales of Kapaun's heroism and faith. The Wichita diocese has continued receiving reports of miracles involving Fr. Kapaun. He is being considered for possible designation as a martyr.

2011

On May 7, 2011, Nick Dellasega collapsed at a Get Busy Living 5K race in Pittsburg, KS (honoring the memory of Dylan Meier). Due to a series of coincidences, Nick survived, even though he had seemingly died on the scene. His childhood friend, EMT Micah Ehling, is quoted by the Eagle as saying "I know what a face looks like when the soul leaves the body. And that's what Nick looked like".[ Some bystanders attribute Nick's survival to the devotion of his cousin, Jonah Dellasega, who fell to his knees at the scene and prayed to Father Emil Kapaun. In a strange coincidence not reported by the Eagle, Dylan Meier, in whose memory the 5K was being held, was slated to teach English in Korea at the time of his death.

Skeptics point out that Kapaun's spirit could not possibly have orchestrated the bizarre coincidences that saved Nick's life, because some of them were set in motion long before Nick collapsed (including a visit by Nick's uncle, Mark, a medical doctor from Greenville, N.C.). However, believers insist Father Kapaun intervened to save Nick's life; The Eagle reports: "The coincidences are strange enough and the prayer notable enough that a Catholic church investigator has reported Nick's story to the Vatican, which happens to have a representative in Wichita again, sizing up Father Emil Kapaun for sainthood."





Memorials


Kapaun Memorial Chapel, Seoul, South Korea; dedicated November 4, 1953.

Kapaun Religious Retreat House, Oiso, Japan; dedicated December 1954.

Kapaun Barracks and Chapel, United States Military Base, Kaiserslautern, Germany; dedicated June 7, 1955.

Father Kapaun Memorial Technical School, Kwanju, Korea; dedicated Summer 1955.

Chaplain Kapaun Memorial High School, Wichita, Kansas; dedicated May 12, 1957. Later to become Kapaun Mt. Carmel High School, 1971.

Bronze Door Panel, Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Wichita, Kansas; dedicated February 1997.

Chaplain Kapaun Korean War Memorial Site, Pilsen, Kansas; dedicated June 3, 2001.

Chaplain Kapaun Complex, Fort Riley, Kansas; dedicated 2001, 2002.

Emil Kapaun Knights of Columbus Fourth Degree Assembly, Katy, TX.

"The Good Thief", a General Electric Theater television production, starred Spencer Tracy as Father Kapaun.




THE END OF THE MEMORIAL
GOD BLESS EACH OF YOU


ACKNOWNLEDGEMENTS


A very special thank you to All Catholic service members of our armed forces, to Judy McCloskey and Catholics in the Military website. Which is dedicated to strengthening military families and promoting vocations to the Military Archdiocese. Tonne,


A very special thank you to the following: Photos of Medal of Honor recipients Courtesy of HomeOfHeroes.com by C. Douglas Sterner please feel free to use whatever is of value to your own efforts. Thanks for your service to our Nation. U.S. Army  Chaplain Center and School, Fort Jackson, South Carolina courtesy of the U.S. Army Chaplain Museum for the opening Mass photo. Kimberly T. Pierce, Executive Director of The Chapel of Four Chaplains


A very special thank you to 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, the 1st Cavalry Division for the use of their video.


Rev. Arthur Tonne, The Story of Chaplain Kapaun,
Patriot Priest of the Korean Conflict. Emporia, KS, 1954.
A very special thank you for the use of your Information and inages.


A very special thank you to Welcome to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit.


To USS Oakland Website
Catholics in the Military Website
Home Of Heroes Website
The Chapel of Four Chaplains Website
To USS Oakland Memorial Website



This Web Page was created by
Paul D. Henriott
Up dated 14 April, 2013